Number Trains

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Number | Posted on September 17, 2015

Numbers to 20
Trains

Students will play with a partner. Each student will be given a train mat (can be  2 xTens Frame), 20 counters and a 20 sided die. They will roll their die and place a counter in each square to the equivalent of the number on the die. The person with the most win.

 

Can be extended to combine two numbers from 2x 10 sided dice.

Number Patterns – Roll-a-Rule

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Pattern | Posted on September 17, 2015

Roll a die, the number rolled becomes the rule for a number pattern. You can either start the number pattern from a zero starting point or roll dice to determine the starting point, depending on students/year level. Use any of the four operations to create a number pattern using the number rolled as the rule. You can use 6, 10 or 20 sided dice depending on students and expectations. For example, I rolled two dice displaying a 9 and a 7. I will start my number pattern from 97. I then rolled a 6. I will subtract 6 as my rule for my number pattern; 97, 91, 85, 79, 73…

Continue this process to make more number patterns!

Carpet Conundrum

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Area | Posted on September 17, 2015

Carpet Conundrum investigation uses area concepts and has an error built in so the students need to work backwards to find it.

Please click the link below for activity details

Carpet Conundrum

 

Removals

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Measurement, Volume | Posted on September 17, 2015

An upper primary – measurement – volume investigation

Click on the link below for task information

Rolfe’s Removals

Foursomes

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Four Operations | Posted on September 17, 2015

A maths challenge using operations and BODMAS

Click on the link below for details

Foursomes – maths challenge

Problem Solving Task

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Four Operations | Posted on September 17, 2015

Ellen is planning a party for her friends. She has invited 100 of them, but she doesn’t know exactly how many of her friends will attend. She wants to put out tables for her friends, and she wants to put enough chairs at each table so that none of her friends have to sit alone. Assume that her friends will fill up each table as they arrive. How many tables should she put out, with how many chairs at each table?

tables

Sweets Shop

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Addition, Money | Posted on September 17, 2015

This activity can carry on from the chocolate bar & lolly shop activity (featured in the Fractions section) by giving each “lolly” a price. Alternatively, you could have the students design a sweets shop (with cakes, slices, etc) or an ice-cream shop (with a range of flavours, cones and toppings!). Students may either write the individual prices onto the lolly shop sheet or may design their own price list. These can be adapted to ability levels. It is up to teachers how far that they want to take the next stage. Ideas are:

  • Ask other students to choose a number of items from their shop, which they would like to “purchase”. Owner of the shop has to add up the total of the items. You may even have them work out the change.
  • Set up a “shop” where the shop items are drawn or constructed out of materials. Using play money (and calculators if needed), students are given the opportunity to go shopping at each other’s shop and “buy” items using their play money. When an item is purchased, shop owners can cut out the item from their sheet and physically give them the item. They must also work out the total price of the items purchased, which the customer is to give them and the shop owner works out the change to give back.

* Please note: if you are allowing students to cut out their items from their poster, you may want to photocopy them just in case!

Subtraction from 10

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Subtraction | Posted on September 17, 2015

Activity: 10 Cup Bowling

Equipment:

  • 10 cups per group
  • 10 balls
  • Masking tape to create lanes
  • 1 x Scoring paper/mini whiteboards and markers per group

This activity is to be completed in small groups of up to 6 players. Students will begin to explore basic subtraction facts from 10 by taking it in turns to bowl down as many cups as possible in one turn. Students will practise verbalising the amount knocked over using number sentences e.g. “Ten take three is seven.” This will provide the next student in line with the player’s score for that turn, which they will record on the score sheet. After all students in the group have had a turn, the winner is the student that has the ‘lowest’ score.

Cover Up (Addition Game)

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Addition | Posted on September 17, 2015

Students will work in pairs and each receive a game board with numbers 1 to 12 along the side and two 6 sided dice. Each player will take turns rolling the dice and add the numbers together, they will then place a counter on that number. The first person to place all their counters on their numbers wins the round.

Addition

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Addition | Posted on September 17, 2015

Addition

  • Teacher explicitly teaches addition strategies relevant to the students level of understanding. Around the room are a variety of tools that students may use to help them work out addition equations such as rulers, number lines, dice, counters, toys. Children roam the room and choose any of the materials to help them complete the equations. All children are using the materials together/next to each other regardless of ability.
    • Students can generate their own addition equations through rolling dice (a variety of dice can be used to suit a students ability such as six sided dot dice, 6 sided numeral dice, 10 or 20 sided dice). Students could also take a small handful/scoop of two different counter colours.
    • Teachers can choose a resource and fishbowl a group to demonstrate.
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