Magic Number

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Posted by MissFelmingham | Posted in Four Operations, Games, Multiplication, Number | Posted on September 6, 2016

This is a multiplication warm up game that can be used for students working at various levels. The kids love it and it really does work for reinforcing times tables.

  • You need a deck of playing cards.
  • Students play in pairs, threes if needed.
  • Depending on the students level you can either instruct them to remove the picture cards or assign each picture card a number i.e. Jack and Queen are 11 and King is 12.
  • Students then get given a Magic Number (decided by the teacher).
  • The students place all the cards in a pile and begin flipping one card over at a time.
  • Students need to multiply the card by their magic number and call out the answer.
  • The first player to do this gets to keep the card. The student with the most cards at the end wins.

Place Value Warm up Game

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Games, Place Value | Posted on September 18, 2015

Click the link below for game details

Place Value Warm Up

Elevens

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Posted by mrsbarnes | Posted in Addition, Four Operations, Games | Posted on December 3, 2014

This is a game that learners can play individually to practise addition to 11. Each learner will need a deck of playing cards. You start by shuffling the cards. Then you lay 9 cards out in a 3X3 matrix.

 

You then need to look for combinations that add up to 11. These are 1+10, 2+9, 3+8, 4+7 and 5+6. If you have a combination that adds up to 11 you cover the two cards with two more cards. The picture cards (King, Queen, Jack) are able to be covered if you have one of each pictures. The aim of the game is to place all of the cards out. If you run out of combinations, you restart the game after shuffling the cards again.

Warm Up – Mastermind

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Posted by Mrs Biggins | Posted in Games, Number, Place Value, Share Time | Posted on December 3, 2014

This is an activity you can use as a warm up or time filler if you have a spare 5-10 minutes.

You can also change this game to meet the different abilities of all students.

Lower levels can use 2-3 digit numbers right up to working with numbers in the hundred thousands if possible.

How to Play

Draw up a place value chart on the whiteboard with the number of columns you need depending on the number you are using.

The teacher writes down their secret number that the students need to work out. (eg. 5920)

Students then need to guess the number and can do this two ways.

Upper Years –  “Is the number 4629?”

You would then put an X against the numbers that are not in the number they are guessing, put a √ on the numbers that are in the number and are in the correct place and put a O against the numbers that are in the number but in the wrong place.

Th

H

T

O

  x

6   x

2  √

9  o

 

Lower years – “Is there a 5 in the tens column?”

You would then mark the number the same as above, put an X against the numbers that are not in the number they are guessing, put a √ on the numbers that are in the number and are in the correct place and put a O against the numbers that are in the number but in the wrong place. The students then keep guessing number by number.

Th

H

T

O

5 o

 

Elevens

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Posted by Mrs Glynn | Posted in Games, Number | Posted on December 3, 2014

Children stand in a circle, the object of the game is to NOT say 11.

Children count to 11, they can say up to three numbers when it is their turn.

For example, Carol says 1,2,3

Nina says 4

Joe says 5,6,7

Garry says 8

Michael says 9 and 10

Then Hannah says 11 and is out of the game.

Continue with this until you have a winner.

Division “I Spy”

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Posted by Miss Araujo | Posted in Division, Games | Posted on December 3, 2014

Use PDF template and answer sheet to prepare the game ahead of time.

How to play:

1. Place all the cards from letters A to L around your Learning Space.

2. Students try to find all the division cards around the Learning Space.

3. As the students find each card, one by one they write down the lettered card and division problem on their answer sheet.

4.Once students find all the cards, to reduce congestion, students can then draw a picture to match each division problem and work out the answers at their tables.

5. Afterwards, correct all the answers together as a whole.

 

*This activity can also be altered to focus on time, multiplication or other operations.

*Can be modified to cater to higher year levels.

DivisionISpyGame

 

Credit to: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/store/Grace-Cheng-1844

QR codes for Four Operation games

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Posted by Miss Gardiner | Posted in Addition, Division, Four Operations, Games, Multiplication, Subtraction | Posted on December 3, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

Four Operation Games - QR codes

Four Operation Games – QR Codes

Students need an iPad or iPod with the QR code scanner application.

Students can scan the QR codes and it takes them to a game that involves one of the four operations.

Bob Down

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Posted by missferris | Posted in Four Operations, Games, Multiplication | Posted on December 3, 2014

Select five students to stand in a horizontal line at the front of the room. Ask the students a multiplication fact. The first student to call out the correct answer bobs down. Ask another multiplication fact to the four remaining students. The first student to call out the correct answer bobs down. Continue until there is only one student standing. That student is out of the game. The four students still in the game stand and begin another round. This process continues until there is a winner.

Students enjoy this game as students who are very quick with recall of facts will be the first ones to bob down in each round and therefore other students get a chance to experience success.

Variations: This game can also be used to practise addition, subtraction or division facts. You can also be creative and use it to practise a variety of mathematical concepts, e.g. show a time on an analogue clock and hold it up for the students to call out the time or write the matching digital time on a small whiteboard.

Greedy Pig

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Posted by missricho | Posted in Addition, Chance, Games | Posted on December 3, 2014

  • Students get their math books and a pen, the teacher will need to have 2 dice.
  • There is a number decided by the whole group that is the “knock out” number (this is normally 6 in my classes)
  • Students stand up behind their chairs (chairs pushed in) when they are ready to begin the game
  • The dice are rolled and the total of both dice is called out. As each number is called out the students write it down
  • When the student/s decide they have been greedy enough they sit down.
  • Students left standing when the 6 is rolled are out and receive a score of 0
  • Everyone else adds their scores up and the winner is the person with the highest score.

For Example:

2,2,3,4,4,4,6=0 if the student was standing 
2,2,3,4,4,4= 19 if the student sits down before the 6 is rolled.

71vkPHZwOpL._SY300_.png

Get out of my house

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Posted by pithere | Posted in Addition, Four Operations, Games, Subtraction | Posted on December 3, 2014

Get out of my house
By Michael Ymer

Focus – addition and subtraction facts to 20.

Suitable for Prep-Year 6

You will need:

  • Game board with the numbers 0-20 displayed in a grid.
  • Dice: 6 sided dot dice and 10 sided dice.

Each student has 7 counters of the same colour. Their partner has a different colour but also needs seven.
Students take turns in rolling the two dice. They may add or subtract the numbers to make an answer (depending on what they can do). One of their seven counters is placed on the number. The objective is to get all 7 counters on the game board before the other player. If a student lands on top of a number that has their partner’s counter on it they take their place and send their counter back to their partner. Students can have more than 1 counter of their own on the same number but if their opponent lands on that number all counters are sent back.

Differentiation:
1. Add or subtract numbers to make an answer with the two dice.
2. Use ten sided dice.
3. Use three dice.
4. Allow any operations – division, multiplication, addition or subtraction.
5. Simplify the game by using a 0-12 game board and only two six sided dice.

 

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