Hit the Target

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Posted by misshampson | Posted in Addition, Four Operations, Number, Place Value | Posted on September 2, 2016

This is a Maths warm up game that can be used to practise both Place Value and Addition skills.
Teachers set a target on the board and in like ability pairs students use a calculator to try and add numbers together to hit the target. This can be used to practise the other operations as well.

For example, the target is 25

Students 1 puts 4 into the calculator
Student 2 needs to figure out what they need to add to 4 to get 25. In this case, they add 21.

Variation: students can play it where they have to add multiple numbers together to hit the target.
For example, if the target is 71.

Student 1 puts 12 into the calculator
Student 2 adds 9 to 12 which equals 21 and so on and so forth.

Olympics Project

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Posted by Miss Gardiner | Posted in Money, Place Value, Time | Posted on August 17, 2016

The students have been invited to the Olympics and need to plan a trip. They receive a budget and have to use it to purchase flights, food and events tickets.

Olympics Money Project

Olympic Money Project

Olympics Money Project 1.0 –

Information Sheet Olympic Money Project 1.0

Olympics Money Project 2.0 –

Information Sheet Olympic Money Project 2.0

Olympic Money Project 3.0

Olympic Money Project 3.5

Olympics Money Project 2.0-3.5 – Information Sheet[1]

 

Shopping Project

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Money, Number, Place Value | Posted on September 18, 2015

Students develop their knowledge of place value in this task. Students get a budget in which they use to buy a range of items. This project covers adding money, ordering money based on their place value, partitioning, representing numbers in different ways etc. They use think boards to show their learning.

Place Value Project

Place Value Warm up Game

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Games, Place Value | Posted on September 18, 2015

Click the link below for game details

Place Value Warm Up

Warm Up – Mastermind

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Posted by Mrs Biggins | Posted in Games, Number, Place Value, Share Time | Posted on December 3, 2014

This is an activity you can use as a warm up or time filler if you have a spare 5-10 minutes.

You can also change this game to meet the different abilities of all students.

Lower levels can use 2-3 digit numbers right up to working with numbers in the hundred thousands if possible.

How to Play

Draw up a place value chart on the whiteboard with the number of columns you need depending on the number you are using.

The teacher writes down their secret number that the students need to work out. (eg. 5920)

Students then need to guess the number and can do this two ways.

Upper Years –  “Is the number 4629?”

You would then put an X against the numbers that are not in the number they are guessing, put a √ on the numbers that are in the number and are in the correct place and put a O against the numbers that are in the number but in the wrong place.

Th

H

T

O

  x

6   x

2  √

9  o

 

Lower years – “Is there a 5 in the tens column?”

You would then mark the number the same as above, put an X against the numbers that are not in the number they are guessing, put a √ on the numbers that are in the number and are in the correct place and put a O against the numbers that are in the number but in the wrong place. The students then keep guessing number by number.

Th

H

T

O

5 o

 

Mission Number Patterns

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Posted by belindas | Posted in Number, Place Value, Websites | Posted on December 3, 2014

Here is a great interactive game to tune in your students and include into your explicit teaching. Boys are really tuned in!

Place Value Mastermind

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Posted by Miss Phillips | Posted in Place Value | Posted on December 3, 2014

Think of a number, depending on your year level you are teaching. (eg. could have decimals if applicable) Similar to hangman write the number of spaces required on the board.

__ __ __ __

 

Children guess the number using the correct language

eg. Is there a ‘3’ in the hundreds place?

9

3

2

0

X

O

X

Put a tick under any number that is correct AND in the correct position. Put a circle under any number that is correct but not in the correct position. Put a cross under any number that is not part of your number.

Children work out quit quickly the correct position of certain and how to correctly say the numbers.

9

2

8

4

O

X

9

5

8

2

X

9

6

8

2

Place Value War

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Posted by misshampson | Posted in Place Value | Posted on December 3, 2014

Learners practise place value and comparing place value through this hands on activity. It can be differentiated by creating larger larger numbers depending on where the learner is at. For example, two-digit, three-digit and four-digit numbers etc.

Players: 2 (encourage learners to pair up with someone of a similar level as them to level the playing field)
Materials: playing cards (Ace=1)-9

How to play:
1) Deal deck of cards out evenly.

2) Each player turns over 2 cards (or whatever place value they are working to). The first number turned over is the tens and the second number is the ones.
*it might be helpful for low learners to have place value columns that they can place the cards in.

3) Both players call out or write down their numbers. (six tens and two ones equals sixty two)

4) The player with the largest number gets all the cards.

5) If there is a tie, WAR is declared. Each player will then place three more cards face down and then turn over two more cards and adds this second number to the first. The player with the largest sum gets all of the cards.
*low learners might need working out paper to assist them.

6) Play continues until one player has collected all of the cards.

Ordering numbers

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Number, Place Value | Posted on September 30, 2014

Instead of using a worksheet for students to practise placing numbers in order, there are many open ended ways of generating numbers:

1. Have a student roll a die a given amount of times (twice for a 2 digit number, 3 times for a three digit number etc.) Have them re arrange the digits to create as many different numbers possible or a given amount of numbers.

2. Have students roll several dice at once and record the number, roll again to create a new number until they have the required amount of numbers needed for ordering.

3. Have students turn over playing cards to create numbers.

4. Pull numbers from a bag.

5. Cut out prices from catalogues.

Highest Number

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Posted by lisar | Posted in Number, Place Value | Posted on September 30, 2014

This is a game played in pairs or small groups.

Each player will need a place value mat. A deck of cards is also needed, split evenly among the pair or group.

Each player draws out the number of cards required to make a number (if a thousands mat is being used four cards are needed, if a hundreds mat is being used three cards are needed).

After drawing out the cards, the student then arranges their cards onto their place value mat creating the largest possible number. Students then compare their numbers to work out who have the largest number overall. The player with the largest number takes all the cards. Play continues until one player has all the cards.

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